Staff directory

DIVISION OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN AREA STUDIES

Ecology and Environment

IWATA, Akihisa

It may seem at first glance that the sustainable use of fishery resources and the conservation of rare fauna are contradictory goals. However, if we adopt the perspective of helping populations to exist eternally, they can be considered the same goal. I am currently carrying out research and activities on the conservation of rare fish named ayumodoki (kissing loach, or Leptobotia curta), which is designated as a protected species in Japan, in Kameoka, Kyoto Prefecture. This experience and the results have directly led to building expertise for the sustainable use of fishery resources in Southeast Asia.

[Geographical areas of interest]
Areas around the Mekong River, especially Laos; and Japan

[Ongoing projects]
Sustainable use and conservation of inland water aquatic resources in Asia

Outline of projects: Aquatic ecological resources are significant in view of the future of the earth. To understand this, it is necessary for us to link the substances of local aquatic ecosystems and forms of fishery resource usage with changes in human society. My geographical areas of interest include areas of Continental Southeast Asia around the Mekong River, particularly Laos, and Japan, all of which are deeply connected in terms of ecology. I aim to carry out research that can contribute to the sustainable use of resources and the conservation of rare fauna and the environment from the relationship between changes in aquatic ecosystems and social changes, based on fishing gear and methods of local people and human activities to use and manage aquatic resources, while covering various environments from riverheads to deltas and grasping biodiversity and the dynamics of aquatic ecosystems.

 

TAKEDA, Shinya

My idea of fieldwork is that we “use our bodies and understand.” That means understanding not with our brains but with our bodies. In other words, it means using our whole bodies and understanding with our five senses. Before starting fieldwork, I imagine a world to which I have never been, by reading books or listening to the words of others. However, once I arrive on the spot, I always encounter a series of surprises. They give me new understanding and create changes for me after my return to Japan. Bearing this in mind, I always try to walk in forests during my fieldwork. Since this requires a strong body, I started going to the gym several years ago, but my body has not changed as I wish.

[Geographical areas of interest]
I have an interest in a wide range of areas from mainland Southeast Asia to the Himalayas.
I am currently conducting research in Myanmar, Laos, Thailand and India.

[Ongoing projects]
Use and transformation of forest resources of local people in tropical Asia

It is said that there is an urgent need to use tropical forests in a sustainable manner and protect biodiversity, but forest area still continues to decrease. However, on the other hand, conservation of forests has been tried since long time ago and some successful examples have been reported. We are examining cases in mountainous areas in mainland Southeast Asia (Laos, Myanmar and Thailand) using field surveys and documents, with the aim to uncover factors behind the formation of the forests and to grasp the regional nature of forestry. Specifically, we are: 1) conducting case studies on the sustainable use and conservation of tropical forest diversity with the production of non-timber forest products in Laos and Myanmar, and 2) exploring the sustainability of forest use in the long run through our research on the history of teak forestry in Thailand and Myanmar. We hope to demonstrate how forests have been regenerated and maintained to date through the respective cases and to obtain concrete suggestions for future tropical forest conservation.

 

NISHIBUCHI, Mitsuaki*

 

ANDO, Kazuo*

 

FURUSAWA, Takuro

 

KOSAKA, Yasuyuki

I study changes in the natural environment in Asia, modernization of agriculture, and depopulation of rural villages, using relations between humans and plants as indices. In specific terms, my research focuses on the flora in agricultural ecological systems, expanded distribution of exotic plants, and wild plants that are sold in the marketplace.

>>website

 

SAKAMOTO, Ryota*


 

Society and Development

SUGISHIMA, Takashi

[Areas of interest]

  • Historical studies for understanding current local communities in Southeast Asia and Oceania
  • Development of theories for grasping social change and continuity and its tangled and mixed state
  • Considerations on area studies. Are area studies spaces in which paradigms of various disciplines act concurrently without competing for hegemony? If so, they contain considerable possibilities and potentials.

[Geographical areas of interest]
Insular Southeast Asia (particularly Eastern Indonesia), and Oceania (particularly Papua New Guinea)

[Ongoing projects]

  • Statistical analysis of genealogcal chart of approximately 3,000 persons, prepared based on my research conducted between 1983 and 1985 in the central part of Flores, Indonesia.
  • Historical considerations on the correlation between the above-mentioned statistical analysis, oral tradition, community documents, and administrative documents of the Dutch colonial era.
  • Analysis of “congratulatory money books” and “condolence money books” in central Flores. I think that there is a form of “wealth” that is not based on possession. In other words, this “affluence” exists according to the extensiveness of human networks and the size of the flow of assets. A chief and his people eat and dress in nearly the same way. It would actually be impossible for a chief to use his vast land and treasures only himself alone.
  • Theoretical work in humanities and social science to clarify that many things can still be learned boundlessly from fieldwork in communities.
  • Translation and editing of the prison autobiography, chronicle and ethnographic memos by Pius Rasi Wangge, raja of the “Landschap Lio,” an administrative unit in central Flores during the Dutch colonial era. Rasi Wangge was arrested as a traitor to the Netherlands and collaborator with the Japanese Army after World War II. He was sent to Kupang, Timor Island and was executed by firing squad in 1947.

 

TAMADA, Yoshifumi

I have felt, during my two decades of research on Thailand, that the country is becoming a developed nation. In the near future, it may be said that “Thailand is no longer a developing country.” In other words, we will need to conduct research on the country considering its changes rather than deciding that it doesn’t need to be surveyed.

[Geographical areas of interest]
Thailand

[Ongoing projects]
Democratization of East and Southeast Asian countries Comparative study on citizenship for foreign residents Comparative study on political-military relations

[Personal interests]
One of my hobbies is collecting books that are not commercially available in Thailand and are useful in my work, including cremation volumes, internal documents and memorial issues of the government bureaus, school yearbooks, and (copies of) master and doctoral theses. These documents contain interesting information that cannot be found in academic texts.

 

HAYAMI, Yoko*

 

ITO, Masako

I prefer the periphery to the center. In Vietnam, I feel more relieved in the mountains in the countryside than in Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City, where the air is dirty. Therefore, people in Hanoi often tell me that I am “peculiar” (and Japanese may do the same). I plan to continue my research from a peripheral point of view.

[Geographical areas of interest]
Vietnam

[Ongoing projects]

  • Relations between ethnic minorities and the Vietnamese government
  • Change in policies toward minority peoples after the introduction of Doi Moi (Renovation) Policies
  • Comparative study of Korea and Vietnam on memories of the Korean military’s participation during the Vietnam War

 

KATAOKA, Tatsuki

I prefer the periphery to the center. In Vietnam, I feel more relieved in the mountains in the countryside than in Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City, where the air is dirty. Therefore, people in Hanoi often tell me that I am “peculiar” (and Japanese may do the same). I plan to continue my research from a peripheral point of view.

[Geographical areas of interest]
Vietnam

[Ongoing projects]

  • Relations between ethnic minorities and the Vietnamese government
  • Change in policies toward minority peoples after the introduction of Doi Moi (Renovation) Policies
  • Comparative study of Korea and Vietnam on memories of the Korean military’s participation during the Vietnam War

 

OKAMOTO, Masaaki*

 

HOSODA,Naomi

My primary research interest is anthropological studies on Filipino migration, with a focus on cultural normality, family, and transnational community. Recently I have been conducting research on life-worlds of Filipino and other Asian migrants in the Arab Gulf countries to investigate how they cope up with long-time precariousness being temporary workers.

[Research Seminar on Society and Development I-IV, Guided Research on Southeast Asian Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Asian Area Studies, Asian Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Hosoda Lab website

 

Environment, Society and Culture

MIZUNO, Kosuke*


KOIZUMI, Junko*


ISHIKAWA, Noboru*


KOZAN, Osamu*


KOBAYASHI, Satoru*


NAKANISHI, Yoshihiro*


 

DIVISION OF AFRICAN AREA STUDIES

Political Ecology

IKENO, Jun

Based on research focusing on rural communities in the semi-arid region of East Africa, Professor Ikeno has studied changes in the rural socio-economic structure through analysis of the diversity of livelihood patterns including urban labor migration. He conducts dynamic analysis of changes in rural community, by looking at both the way communities adapt to external changes in the political, economical and social environment, and realize the endogenous development capacity leading to its own social transformation. In recent years, he has investigated the socio-economic significance of dry season irrigation farming, by conducting a succession of field surveys during the dry season (July-October) in the North Pare Lowland of Northeastern Tanzania.

Biography
Born in Osaka prefecture
1973 Graduated from Koyo Gakuin High School
1978 Graduated from the Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo
1978 Appointed researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies (East Africa area studies)
1982-84 Appointed IDE research fellow in Kenya
1990-93 Appointed IDE senior research fellow in Tanzania
1997 Appointed associate professor at the Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
1998 Appointed associate professor at the Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University
2001-02 Appointed JICA Long-term Expert (focus on socioeconomy) at Centre for Sustainable Rural Development, Sokoine University of Agriculture (Tanzania)
2008 Appointed to current position as professor of Kyoto University

Research theme: socio-economic transformation of rural communities in Northern Tanzania

Geographical areas of interest: Mwanga District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

ITANI, Juichi

Associate Professor Itani studies a framework and methodology for examining African rural development from the perspective of environmental conservation and utilization. This framework and methodology are designed to promote understanding of the realities in rural areas through interdisciplinary fieldwork and participatory approaches that would underpin attempts to develop solutions based on indigenous characteristics. In addition, he explores the processes that new ideas or technologies are created in African rural areas through the integration of external and indigenous factors.

Biography
Born in 1961
1985 Graduated from the Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University
1990 Graduated from the Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University
1990 Appointed researcher at the Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University
1997 Appointed to the faculty of the Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University
1998 Appointed associate professor at Kyoto University

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

TAKADA, Akira

Research topic: Development of social interactions among the San of Southern Africa
Associate Professor Takada’s work focuses on the San (Bushmen), known as the hunter-gatherers of Southern Africa, with respect to the following four domains of research.

1. Caregiver-child interactions
2. Systems of caregiver-child interactions, subsistence activities, and the natural environment
3. Environmental perception
4. Transformation of ethnicity among the San and their neighbors
Furthermore, by linking these researches, he attempts to understand the cultural structure that organizes social interactions among the San.

 

Biography
Born in Ishikawa Prefecture
April 1994 Enrolled in the Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University
March 1996 Completed Master’s course, Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University
April 1996 Enrolled in Doctorate course, African Area Studies, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
March 2002 completed the coursework of the doctorate course
March 2003 Received Ph.D. (Human and Environmental Studies) from Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
After working as Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science,
April 2004 appointed as assistant professor of ASAFAS, Kyoto University
July-September 2007 appointed as visiting scholar of the UCLA Center for Language, Interaction, and Culture
January 2009 appointed to current position as associate professor of ASAFAS, Kyoto University

 

Geographical areas of interest:
Ghanzi, Botswana
Ohangwena, Namibia
California, USA
Kansai, Japan
eto Inland Sea.

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

KANEKO, Morie

 

SATO, Hiroki

 

Cultural Ecology

KIMURA, Daiji

Professor Kimura has been conducting anthropological research in tropical Africa. From 1986 to 1989, he studied the Bongando people, shifting-cultivators in DR Congo. Because of the political and economic confusion, and succeeding civil wars in former Zaire, the research among the Bongando interrupted until 2005. In 1993, he started new research on the Baka hunter-gatherers in Cameroon. In both fields, he focused on the ecology and social interaction of the local people (see Main Publications below).

Biography
1960 Born in Ehime prefecture, Japan
1983 Graduated from the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
1985 Received master’s degree from the Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
1990 Received Ph.D. in Science, Kyoto University
1992 Appointed associate professor at Faculty of Education Fukui University
1997 Appointed associate professor at Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
1998 Appointed associate professor at Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University
2012 Appointed professor at Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, and director at Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

TAKAHASHI, Motoki

 

YAMAKOSHI, Gen

Gen Yamakoshi is researching the diversity of relations between humans and wildlife in the West Africa. He is developing research on the potential of West African traditional landscapes, sacred forests in particular, to support various wildlife populations.

Biography
Born in 1969
1988 Graduated from Matsumoto Fukashi High School
1992 Graduated from the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
1994 Completed the master’s degree (Primatology), Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
1997 Completed the degree of Doctor of Science (Primatology), Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
1997-99 Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (PD), Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
1999 Appointed to the assistant professor of ASAFAS, Kyoto University
2004 Appointed to the associate professor of ASAFAS, Kyoto University

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

OYAMA, Shuichi

Shuichi Oyama emphasizes the importance of multi-disciplinary approaches of geography, anthropology, ecology and agronomy and understanding all aspects of people’s lives in Africa, including household economy, natural environment, economic policies, national/global politics, social relationships in local communities, ethnicity and so on.

Biography
Born in Nara, Japan in August, 1971
1993 Skipping a grade from Faculty of Environmental Information, Keio University
1995 Completed the master course, Graduate School of Human and Environment, Kyoto University
1999 Completed the doctor course, Graduate School of Human and Environment, Kyoto University
1999 Appointed to the assistant professor, Department of Geography, Tokyo Metropolitan University
2008 Appointed to the associate professor, Department of Geography, Tokyo Metropolitan University
2010 Appointed to the associate professor of ASAFAS, Kyoto Univeristy

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

Historical Ecology

OHTA, Itaru

Research theme: Human-livestock relations and social changes in African pastoral societies

Professor Ohta has conducted research on various aspects of livestock-human relations in pastoral societies that are widespread in the arid area of Africa. In particular, he focuses on the social behavior of livestock, the indigenous skills needed for herding and husbandry, livestock classification system by coat-color, horns, and age-sex, individual identification, cognition and treatment of livestock diseases, and mechanism of ownership/gift-giving/exchanges. Pastoral societies in Africa cultivated cultures deeply rooted in their livestock management, but they are rapidly changing under economic and political globalization. How are these peoples’ lives changing, how do they perceive the social environment that is also changing dramatically, and how are they coping with their circumstance? Professor Ohta’s present research theme is to understand these changes.

Academic background:
Born in Nagano prefecture
1972 Graduated from Nagano High School
1976 Graduated from the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
1978 Received master’s degree from the Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
1984 After completion of the doctoral course, left the Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
1986 Received Ph.D. of Science, Kyoto University

Work experience:
1984 Fellow at the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
1986 Assistant professor at the Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University
1989 Appointed as associate professor at the Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University
1996 Appointed as associate professor at the Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
1998 Appointed as associate professor at ASAFAS, Kyoto University
2004 Appointed as professor at ASAFAS, Kyoto University

Academic conference memberships:
1981 Japan Association for African Studies
1985 Japanese Society of Ethnology
1985 Primate Society of Japan
1992 Japanese Nile Ethiopia Society
1996 Society for Ecological Anthropology

Geographical areas of interest:
Kenya (Northwestern region, near the borders of Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia)
Namibia (Northwestern region, near the border of Angola)

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

SHIGETA, Masayoshi

Professor Shigeta has investigated various issues surrounding African agriculture, from the perspective of person-plant relationships (including agricultural science, anthropology, ecology, crop evolution studies, ethnobotany, and domestication). He is working on development issues faced by local communities in Africa through the analysis of useful plants that have long been cultivated by the people of Africa as cultural resources, and related local knowledge.

Fields of specialization: Anthropology, Person-plant relationships, Domestication, Ethno-biology/botany, Agricultural Biology, Development and education, Study on culture of sleep

Biography
Born in 1956 in Kyoto Prefecture
April 1976 Enrolled in the Department of Agricultural Biology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University
March 1981 Graduated from the Department of Agricultural Biology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University
April 1981 Enrolled in the Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University
Nov. 1981 – Oct. 1983 Studied at the Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi
March 1985 Received master’s degree from the Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University
April 1985 Enrolled in the doctoral course, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University
April 1989 Left school after completion of doctoral coursework
May 1989 Appointed as Assistant Professor of the Center for African Area Studies, Kyoto University
Jan. 1992 Received doctoral degree of Agricultural Science, Kyoto University
April 1996- March 1998 Appointed as Associate Professor of the Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University
April 1998-present Appointed as Associate Professor of African Area Studies at ASAFAS, Kyoto University

 

Geographical areas of interest:
-Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa area
-Kenya
-Sudan (Southern Sudan)

Division of African Area Studies, Staff page

 

HIRANO-NOMOTO, Misa

 

YASUOKA, Hirokazu

Hirokazu Yasuoka has studied about relationships between human and nature based on long-term field research with hunter-gatherers in Central Africa. He is recently developing applied research on collaborative forest resource management between scientists and local people.

Biography
Born in 1976 in Kochi
1995 Graduated from Tosa High School
1999 Graduated from the Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
2006 Completed the coursework of the doctorate course, ASAFAS, Kyoto University
2007 Received PhD in Area Studies, Kyoto University
2007 Appointed to the senior assistant professor, Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University
2011-2013 Appointed to the visiting researcher, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), France
2013 Appointed to the associate professor, Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University
2015 Appointed to the associate professor of ASAFAS, Kyoto University

 

DIVISION OF GLOBAL AREA STUDIES

Peaceful Coexistence and Humanosphere

KOSUGI, Yasushi

Name: KOSUGI Yasushi (professor)

Place and year of birth: Hokkaido, Japan, 1953

Majors: Islamic studies, Middle East area studies, comparative politics and international politics

Geographical areas of interest:

  • – Islamic world
  • – Middle East and North Africa
  • – Arab nations
    Latest work: Gendai Islam sekai ron (The Contemporary Islamic World) (University of Nagoya Press, Feb. 2006)

Research themes:

  • – Contemporary Islamic world views
  • – Islamic political ideas
  • – Trends in contemporary Islamic ideas and the Islamic Revival Movement
  • – Arabic as a regional language

Areas of interest:

  • – Reinterpretation of Islamic law in modern times
  • – Comparison between regions in the Islamic world
  • – Genealogy and historical development of Islamic political ideas
  • – Organizations of the contemporary Islamic Revival Movement and their ideas
  • – Regional differences in vocabularies and usage of standard Arabic

Ongoing projects:

  • – Contemporary development of political ideas in the interpretation of the Quran
  • – Islamic law, the modern nation and democratization
  • – Ideas and trends of Islamic moderates in modern times
  • – Terminology of politics and Islamic law in Arabic

Research projects involved:

  • – 21st Century COE Program “Aiming for COE of Integrated Area Studies” (vice secretary)
  • – Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research “Arabic as a regional language: Educational strategies and resource development” (representative researcher)

 

KONO, Yasuyuki*

 

MATSUBAYASHI, Kozo*

 

FUJITA, Koichi*

 

D’Souza, Rohan

[Research themes]
Environmental, history and politics of South Asia

[Areas of interest]
Environmental History, Technology Studies, Climate Change and Environmental Politics in the Anthropocene

[Geographical areas of interest]
India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Pakistan

[Ongoing projects]
The Great Hydraulic Transition: colonial engineers and the making of modern rivers in South Asia [Book MS under preparation]

[Introduction]
Rohan D’Souza is the author of Drowned and Dammed: Colonial Capitalism and Flood control in Eastern India (1803-1946), Oxford University Press, 2006. His edited books include The British Empire and the Natural World: Environmental Encounters in South Asia, Oxford University Press, 2011 and Environment, Technology and Development: critical and subversive essays, Orient BlackSwan, 2012.

Rohan D’Souza has held postdoctoral fellowships at Yale University (Agrarian Studies Program) and University of California, Berkeley (the Ciriacy-Wantrup fellow). He was visiting Professor of Contemporary Indian Studies at the University of Tokyo and was Senior Research Associate at the Centre for World Environmental History (University of Sussex). He has held visiting fellowships at the Australian National University, University of Pennsylvania and Kyoto University. Prior to joining ASAFAS (Kyoto University), Rohan D’Souza had previously thought at Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi, India).

>>Website

 

Islamic World Studies

TONAGA, Yasushi

[Research themes]

  • Research on the School of Ibn Arabi
  • Theory building on Sufism
  • Research on regional development of Sufism

[Areas of interest]

  • The school of Ibn Arabi in the Ottoman Empire era
  • Comparison between regions in terms of Sufism in the Islamic world
  • Correlation between the ideas and movements of Sufism
  • Links between Islamic fundamentalism and Sufism

[Geographical areas of interest]

  • Entire Islamic world (including Western areas where there has been a restoration and spread of Sufism)

[Ongoing projects]

  • Research on Abdullah Bosnevi
  • Comparison of ideas on Sufism between Sunni and Shiite Islam in the 17th century
  • Translation of basic literature on Sufism
  • Elaboration of the tripolar structure of Sufism

 

NAGAOKA, Shinsuke

 

OBIYA, Chika*

 

South Asian and Indian Ocean Area Studies

FUJIKURA, Tatsuro

Research on South Asia, Nepal, anthropology, development, NGOs, social movements and democratization

Biography
Name
: FUJIKURA Tatsuro
1984 Graduated from Doshisha International High School
1988  Department of Law, Faculty of Law, Keio University, LL.B
1992  Yale Law School, LL.M
(1996-99 Visiting researcher, Centre for Nepal and Asian Studies, Tribhuvan University)
2004 The University of Chicago, PhD in Anthropology
(PhD Dissertation title: Discourses of Awareness: Development, Social Movements and the Practices of Freedom in Nepal)
2004-5 Senior Researcher, Centre for Social Research and Development (CSRD), Kathmandu
2004-present. Editor, Studies in Nepali History and Society

 

NAKAMIZO, Kazuya

 

KAGOTANI, Naoto*

 

INABA, Minoru*

 

NAKAMURA, Sae

 

(Those Professors denoted by asterisk (*) are from other faculties and institutes within the university.)

Divisions/Staff

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