Global Area Studies

Division of Global Area Studies

This new division has been established in April, 2009. It deals with aspects of Asian and African area studies with stronger global orientations. Considering the increasing globalization and its impact on various aspects of life in Asia and Africa in general, and South Asia — Indian Ocean Area, West Asia, Central Asia, and North Africa in particular, this division puts focus on area specific subjects in these areas and global issues encompassing these areas, such as environmental problems, transnational movements, and cross-area comparative studies.

1: Peaceful coexistence and Humanosphere:

TWhat would it mean for communities and societies in Asia and Africa to realize the ideal for peaceful coexistence and achieving sustainable livelihoods? This theme will concern our research and teaching effort in the module “Peaceful Coexistence and the Humanosphere”. The question of the relationships between humans and their environments has, in fact, always been a central one in Area Studies, but as globalization has begun to unfold, the issues that surround it have become even more intense and complex. In the classes offered in this Department, students will research and engage with the concerns and questions related to the study of peaceful coexistence and sustainable humanosphere

Yasushi KOSUGI

E-mail: kosugi@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

My research has concentrated on analyzing the Islamic revivalist movement with the aim of obtaining a true picture of the Islamic world today. At present I am examining the latest developments in Islamic political thought, the contemporary reconstruction of Islamic law and various social systems, international Islamic organizations, Islamic finance and its influence, and other areas. I am interested in researching and teaching about a wide array of political, social and cultural topics and the dynamics that surround them in the contemporary Middle East.

[Study of the Islamic World, Study of Islamic Thought, Reading Original Arabic Texts I-II, Introduction to Area studies, Contemporary Middle East and North Africa Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Kazuya NAKAMIZO

E-mail: nakamizo@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

My research topic is to explore the possibilities for democracy in solving poverty and violence. Under this theoretical framework, I have been working on Indian politics, especially focusing on Bihar, which is well-known for poverty and violence within India. Recently I have begun to work on the impact of globalization, that is, new forms of widening disparity and the realization of peace and coexistence, by conducting field work in all regions of India and South Asia.

[Theory of Peace and Coexistence, Comparative Asian Politics, Introduction to Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

D’Souza, Rohan

E-mail: rohand@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

My initial teaching and research efforts were aimed at exploring themes in environmental history. In particular, I looked at late nineteenth and early twentieth century water management and flood control histories in South Asia. Pursuing these concerns, however, also involved engaging with several lively contemporary debates on large dams and questioning the agreed wisdom on notions such as development, environmentalism and sustainability. My research themes have since then been further broadened with explorations in linked conceptual puzzles such as modern technology, the origins of modern science, policy making, political ecology, security studies and inevitably climate change anxieties. In effect, such a collection of overlapping research and teaching themes have helped set up my current engagements with the idea of ‘sustainable humanosphere’: aspects, processes and elements that are critical to sustaining human societies and their environs.

[Sustainable Humanosphere and the environment, Seminar on Asian and Afircan Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Yasuyuki KONO

E-mail: kono@cseas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

My research covers contemporary issues to do with coexistence of agricultural production and environmental conservation, and with effective management of increasingly scarce land and water resources in rural villages in Southeast Asia, looking into a variety of aspects, including the environment, economic systems, political systems, and administrative and agricultural organizations. In addition to using conventional fieldwork methods, I have also been experimenting with the introduction of innovative computer-related data gathering and analysis methods in Area Studies that use GIS and remote-sensing.

[An Interdisciplinary Approach to Sustainable Humanosphere, Development and Ecology, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Koichi FUJITA

E-mail: kfujita@cseas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

With academic background of agricultural economics, I have been doing fieldwork-based research in rural India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam. Recently, I also started to do a research connecting history and contemporary issues, by exploring how rural societies in different parts of monsoon Asia (East, Southeast and South Asia) evolved and transformed in each historical path dependency. The ultimate target of mine is to establish a new area study of monsoon Asia.

[Non-modern Approaches in Area Study, Seminar on Asian and African Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

2: Islamic World Studies:

Students do integrated research on the unity and diversity of the Islamic world and the thought, history, and contemporary societies of regions that belong to the Islamic world, especially the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. Comparisons among the regions, the Islamic world as a “meta area” in international relations, Islam in Western Europe and North America, and other questions that affect the Islamic world as a whole or multiple regions will also be the objects of research.

Yasushi TONAGA

E-mail: tonaga@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

I have been engaging in philological research of Islamic thought, especially Sufism, focusing on the Arab and Turkish worlds. My research, much of it based on on-site investigations, encompasses a wide variety of subjects, from highly sophisticated speculative philosophy to popular reverence for walī as a means of obtaining profit in the present world.

[Study of the Islamic World; Study of Islamic Thought, Sufism and Tariqa Studies I-II, Persian I, Turkish I, Seminar on Asian and African Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Shinsuke NAGAOKA

E-mail: nagaoka@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

I have been focusing on Islamic finance, which first emerged in the Middle East in the 1970s and which is currently spreading globally with rapid growth. My main research insterst is to clarify the unique characteristics of the concepts and philosophies of Islamic economics, which underlie the practices of Islamic finance, adopting the methodology of economics (in the broadest sense). Based on my research, I will reconsider economic theory, economic history, and economic thought from the perspective of Islamic economics and finance, in order to take a critical look at the essence of the capitalist system generated by Western modernization.

[Study of the Islamic World, Sustainable Humanosphere in Arid Areas, Islamic Society and Economics I-II-III, Reading Original Arabic Texts I-II, Seminar on Asian and African Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Chika OBIYA

E-mail: obiya@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

I have been interested in the former Soviet Central Asia, especially Uzbekistan, researching the modern and contemporary history of this region in relationship with the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. My specific research topics include Central Asia under Russian imperial rule, Central Asia and the Russian revolution, national delimitation in Central Asia under Soviet rule, Soviet modernization in Central Asia, and nationalism in contemporary Uzbekistan. In recent years, I have been also interested in preservation, sharing, and effective use of rare documents for Central Asian area studies.

[Central Asian Area Studies, Introduction to Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

3: South Asian and Indian Ocean Area Studies:

We will research South Asia itself and the wide area known as the Indian Ocean world, which includes South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, East Africa, and East Asia, which are deeply interrelated in pan-Indian Ocean networks. In addition to taking up questions that are unique to the South Asian region, we will also look at a variety of questions that concern all the areas or several areas around the Indian Ocean for which South Asia serves as the focal point.

Tatsuro FUJIKURA

E-mail: fujikura@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

I have been conducting anthropological research on the process of modernization in Nepal. In particular, I have discussed the question of how people’s sense of agency has been transformed through the practices of development and national education, and how unexpected social movements (such as violent revolutionary movements and bonded agricultural laborers’ freedom movement) have occurred as a result.

[South Asian Area Studies I-II, Introduction to Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies I-IV, Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Sae NAKAMURA

E-mail: nakamura@asafas [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

My academic concerns are broadly aimed at themes in medical anthropology with a focus on the anthropology of suffering, care, ethics and humanitarianism. I have carried out intensive field work in an old age people’s home in Sri Lanka, and explored and studied how issues of aging, dying and its care are handled in particular kinds of institutional contexts.  In a sense, I am keen to understand how the ‘intimate’ is constructed through notions of the ethics of care and by practices that shape inter-personal /-corporeal encounters.

[South Asian Area Studies I-II, Seminar on Asian and African Area Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies Ⅰ-Ⅳ , Guided Research on Global Area Studies I-III, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar I-III]

Naoto KAGOTANI

E-mail: kago@zinbun [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

The foreign traders who flooded into Japan following the opening-up of the ports at the end of the Edo period included not only Western merchants but also Asian traders, primarily Chinese. Japan’s modernization included an aspect of responding to trends coming out of Asia. Particularly in respect of cotton textile manufacture and trade, Japan’s major industry in the prewar period, the export of manufactured goods was heavily dependent on the trade networks operated by overseas Chinese. Dependence on their networks was also an inevitable aspect of the war economy that spread throughout the Asian region, and I believe that the foundation for Japan’s defeat was laid at the stage when that dependence became problematic. I am studying Japan’s dependence on overseas trade through networks operated by Asian merchants.

[South Asian and Indian Ocean Studies, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies Ⅰ-Ⅳ , Guided Research on Global Area Studies Ⅰ-Ⅲ , Global Area Studies On-site Seminar Ⅰ-Ⅲ]

Minoru INABA

E-mail: i-minor@zinbun [add “.kyoto-u.ac.jp”]

Focusing on the intersection of the premodern history of present-day Afghanistan and the history of the eastward movement of Islam after the seventh century, I am studying cultural contacts and cultural transformation among Central Asia, West Asia, and South Asia. In recent years, I have been using documentary and archeological materials to trace the nature and transformation of the transportation routes that link these regions.

[Studies on the Indian Ocean World, Research Seminar on Global Area Studies Ⅰ-Ⅳ , Guided Research on Global Area Studies Ⅰ-Ⅲ, Open Seminar on Global Area Studies, Global Area Studies On-site Seminar Ⅰ-Ⅲ]

 

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